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The Latest technology can figure out heart failure in 8 minutes. A group of researchers at the University of East Anglia has created a unique technique to diagnose heart failure patients in history time. This method uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to make complex 4D flow images of the heart.

The new 4D cardiac MRI

Amazingly, the new 4D cardiac MRI scan takes only 8 minutes, as opposed to standard MRI scans, which can carry up to 20 minutes or more. Scientists appropriate the results to provide an accurate picture of heart valves and blood flow within the heart. This allows doctors to determine the best course of treatment for their patients.

Heart patients at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) were the first to try this new technology. Meanwhile, researchers hope their work will revolutionize the speed of heart failure diagnosis, benefiting hospitals and patients around the world.

Heart Failure

“Heart failure is a frightening condition caused by increased pressure within the heart. The best way to diagnose heart failure is an invasive test. But it is not preferred because of the risks involved. However, this method can be unreliable. 4D flow-through MRI allows you to see flow over time in three dimensions, or four dimensions,” said principal investigator Dr. Pankaj Garg of Norwich Medical School at UEA and emeritus consultant cardiologist at NNUH.

“Therefore, in collaboration with General Electric Healthcare, we investigated the reliability of a new technology called Kat-ARC that scans the flow within the heart using an ultra-fast method. We also demonstrated that this noninvasive imaging technique can accurately and accurately measure peak blood flow velocities in the heart,” Assadi said in a statement. increase.

The team tried the latest technology on 50 patients at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals and Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in Sheffield.

The results of this analysis were printed in the serial European Radiology Experimental on September 22nd.

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